Wait… Facebook dit what now? Ethics, experiments, and the algorithmic manipulation of everyday life

I’m rushing to finish up a numer of things before flying to Spain for a conference. So Facebook chose the wrong possible moment to do what Facebook does best – manipulate data and algorithms without giving a damn about the well-being of a billion users. Except this time it was not done for profit, but for science. Controversy ensued nonetheless.

Unfortunately, I don’t have time to write a 5,000 word essay about this. Moreover, as an academic I’m fed up with being an accessory to Big Platform storytelling. So, I point you to a couple of nice articles written by colleagues. They all make really valid points, and you should probably read them if you want to overcome the rhetoric conveyed by the press and the TV, which boils down to saying “you should be outraged because during the last 10 years you’ve been more interested in crap stories about Web celebrities, adorable dogs, and violent teenagers that we’ve been feeding you in our technology columns, and you never took the time to realize that the very mission of a medium like Facebook is to manipulate people’s feelings, opinions, and moods”.

So, without further ado, here are the recommended readings. You can use them to outsmart your geeky friends during your Summer outings.

Excerpt: “(…) it’s not clear what the notion that Facebook users’ experience is being “manipulated” really even means, because the Facebook news feed is, and has always been, a completely contrived environment. I hope that people who are concerned about Facebook “manipulating” user experience in support of research realize that Facebook is constantly manipulating its users’ experience. In fact, by definition, every single change Facebook makes to the site alters the user experience, since there simply isn’t any experience to be had on Facebook that isn’t entirely constructed by Facebook. When you log onto Facebook, you’re not seeing a comprehensive list of everything your friends are doing, nor are you seeing a completely random subset of events. In the former case, you would be overwhelmed with information, and in the latter case, you’d get bored of Facebook very quickly. Instead, what you’re presented with is a carefully curated experience that is, from the outset, crafted in such a way as to create a more engaging experience (read: keeps you spending more time on the site, and coming back more often). The items you get to see are determined by a complex and ever-changing algorithm that you make only a partial contribution to (by indicating what you like, what you want hidden, etc.). It has always been this way, and it’s not clear that it could be any other way. So I don’t really understand what people mean when they sarcastically suggest–as Katy Waldman does in her Slate piece–that “Facebook reserves the right to seriously bum you out by cutting all that is positive and beautiful from your news feed”. Where does Waldman think all that positive and beautiful stuff comes from in the first place? Does she think it spontaneously grows wild in her news feed, free from the meddling and unnatural influence of Facebook engineers?”

Excerpt: “I identify this model of control as a Gramscian model of social control: one in which we are effectively micro-nudged into “desired behavior” as a means of societal control. Seduction, rather than fear and coercion are the currency, and as such, they are a lot more effective. (Yes, short of deep totalitarianism, legitimacy, consent and acquiescence are stronger models of control than fear and torture—there are things you cannot do well in a society defined by fear, and running a nicely-oiled capitalist market economy is one of them).

The secret truth of power of broadcast is that while very effective in restricting limits of acceptable public speech, it was never that good at motivating people individually. Political and ad campaigns suffered from having to live with “broad profiles” which never really fit anyone. What’s a soccer mom but a general category that hides great variation? With new mix of big data and powerful, oligopolistic platforms (like Facebook) all that is solved, to some degree. Today, more and more, not only can corporations target you directly, they can model you directly and stealthily. They can figure out answers to questions they have never posed to you, and answers that you do not have any idea they have. Modeling means having answers without making it known you are asking, or having the target know that you know. This is a great information asymmetry, and combined with the behavioral applied science used increasingly by industry, political campaigns and corporations, and the ability to easily conduct random experiments (the A/B test of the said Facebook paper), it is clear that the powerful have increasingly more ways to engineer the public, and this is true for Facebook, this is true for presidential campaigns, this is true for other large actors: big corporations and governments.”

Excerpt: “(…) on the substance of the research, there are still serious questions about the validity of methodological tools used , the interpretation of results, and use of inappropriate constructs. Prestigious and competitive peer-reviewed journals like PNAS are not immune from publishing studies with half-baked analyses. Pre-publication peer review (as this study went through) is important for serving as a check against faulty or improper claims, but post-publication peer review of scrutiny from the scientific community—and ideally replication—is an essential part of scientific research. Publishing in PNAS implies the authors were seeking both a wider audience and a heightened level of scrutiny than publishing this paper in a less prominent outlet. To be clear: this study is not without its flaws, but these debates, in of themselves, should not be taken as evidence that the study is irreconcilably flawed. If the bar for publication is anticipating every potential objection or addressing every methodological limitation, there would be precious little scholarship for us to discuss. Debates about the constructs, methods, results, and interpretations of a study are crucial for synthesizing research across disciplines and increasing the quality of subsequent research.

Third, I want to move to the issue of epistemology and framing. There is a profound disconnect in how we talk about the ways of knowing how systems like Facebook work and the ways of knowing how people behave. As users, we expect these systems to be responsive, efficient, and useful and so companies employ thousands of engineers, product managers, and usability experts to create seamless experiences.  These user experiences require diverse and iterative methods, which include A/B testing to compare users’ preferences for one design over another based on how they behave. These tests are pervasive, active, and on-going across every conceivable online and offline environment from couponing to product recommendations. Creating experiences that are “pleasing”, “intuitive”, “exciting”, “overwhelming”, or “surprising” reflects the fundamentally psychological nature of this work: every A/B test is a psych experiment.”

[UPDATE 29.06.2014] Just when folks in the academic community were finally coming back to their senses, the first author of the Facebook study issued an “apology” that will go down in the annals of douchebaggerdom.

“The reason we did this research is because we care about the emotional impact of Facebook and the people that use our product. We felt that it was important to investigate the common worry that seeing friends post positive content leads to people feeling negative or left out. At the same time, we were concerned that exposure to friends’ negativity might lead people to avoid visiting Facebook. We didn’t clearly state our motivations in the paper. (…) And we found the exact opposite to what was then the conventional wisdom: Seeing a certain kind of emotion (positive) encourages it rather than suppresses is.”

[Shakespearean aside: The key sentence here is “we were concerned that exposure to friends' negativity might lead people to avoid visiting Facebook”: so this study demonstrates that if Facebook just suppresses every hint of negativity and forcefeeds users with sugar-coated unicorns, people won't develop some kind of “diabetes of the soul”. ]

“Nobody’s posts were « hidden, » they just didn’t show up on some loads of Feed.”

[Shakespearean aside: Why, that reassur... wait a minute! Isn't “not showing” synonymous with “hiding”?]

Having written and designed this experiment myself, I can tell you that our goal was never to upset anyone. I can understand why some people have concerns about it, and my coauthors and I are very sorry for the way the paper described the research and any anxiety it caused.

[Shakespearean aside: Wouldn't want to overinterpret that, but he seems to say he's sorry for the anxieties caused by the publication of the paper, not for the anxieties allegedly caused by the experiment itself...]

Share Button

[Slides] Séminaire EHESS Louise Merzeau « Présence numérique : traces, éditorialisation, mémoire » (19 mai 2014, 17h)

Dans le cadre de mon séminaire EHESS Étudier les cultures du numérique : approches théoriques et empiriques, nous avons eu le plaisir d’accueillir Louise Merzeau, maître de conférences HDR à l’Université Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense et directrice adjointe du laboratoire Dicen-IDF. La séance, centrée sur la notion de présence dans le contexte du numérique, a eu lieu le lundi 19 mai 2014, à l’EHESS.

Présence numérique : traces, éditorialisation, mémoire from Louise Merzeau


Titre : Présence numérique : traces, éditorialisation, mémoire
Intervenant : Louise Merzaeu

 

Résumé : Entre symptôme et branding, la gestion de nos traces numériques s’exerce souvent sur le mode de la dépossession. Présentée tantôt comme une somme d’indices à corréler, tantôt comme une marque à valoriser, l’identité numérique est largement déterminée par l’affordance des dispositifs et des stratégies qui précèdent et excèdent l’individu. En marge des discours d’injonction à communiquer, il y a donc un enjeu à penser notre présence en ligne autrement : comme une expérience transmédiatique, qui documentarise nos traces et les greffe sur des mémoires partagées.

 

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

Slides des séances passées :

• 18 nov 2013
Antonio A. Casilli (Telecom ParisTech, EHESS)
Le rôle des visualisations de données dans la recherche sur les cultures numériques

• 16 déc 2013
Anne Dalsuet (philosophe, auteure de ‘T’es sur Facebook’, Flammarion 2013), Stéphane Vial (Université de Nîmes)
Amitié et manifestation d’autrui : pour une philosophie des réseaux sociaux numériques

• 20 janv 2014
Nicolas Colin (The Family)
L’Âge de la multitude : Enjeux économiques et de gouvernance après la révolution numérique   

• 17 févr 2014
Estelle Aubouin (CELSA), Sylvain Abel (ISCOM)
Le web éphémère : de 4chan à Snapchat

• 17 mars 2014

Paola Tubaro (U. of Greenwich, CNRS), Antonio A. Casilli (Telecom ParisTech, EHESS)
Web et privacy : le renoncement à la vie privée n’a jamais eu lieu

• 28 avril 2014

Nicolas Auray (Telecom ParisTech, EHESS)
Débattre de l’officieux. Une contradiction interne au hackérisme

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

Prochaines séances 2013/14 :

•16 juin 2014
Simon Chignard (donneesouvertes.info ) et Samuel Goëta (Telecom ParisTech)
Le mouvement « open data »

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

Share Button

[Séminaire EHESS] Nicolas Auray : Hacker, Etat et politique (28 avril 2014, 17h)

Dans le cadre de mon séminaire EHESS Étudier les cultures du numérique : approches théoriques et empiriques, nous avons eu le plaisir d’accueillir Nicolas Auray, maître de conférences HDR à Télécom ParisTech et chercheur associé au laboratoire Théories du Politique (LabTop). La séance, centrée sur hacker, Etat et politique,  a eu lieu le lundi 28 avril 2014, de 17h à 19h à l’EHESS, salle 6, 105 bd. Raspail, Paris (6e arrondissement).

hackgovt

Titre : Débattre de l’officieux. Une contradiction interne au hackérisme

Intervenant : Nicolas Auray

Résumé : « Le propos visera tout d’abord à faire l’histoire de la manière dont se sont nouées, dans l’espace des cultures digitales, une stratégie d’auto-appellation comme hackers de collectifs aux contours flous qui se sont reconnus avant tout autour de « bons exemples »,  et des pratiques organisées qui ont transformé l’Etat, le capitalisme et les modèles de la démocratie. Pour cela, je partirai d’une enquête historique et cartographique sur le hackerisme, comme catégorie attributive, et chercherai à montrer son extension à de nouveaux groupes, mais aussi une opposition entre trois registres cadrant ses expérimentations politiques. L’exposé visera aussi à documenter l’originalité de la période postérieure à 2008, et à stimuler des réflexions quant au rapport entre « politique des hackers » et transformation de l’Etat. Face à une certaine naïveté propre au discours pour la transparence porté par certains hackers, il s’agit de clarifier les voies possibles par lesquelles cette politique radicale amène à penser l’écart entre officiel et officieux. En amenant à discuter des frontières de l’officieux, les hackers touchent à l’Etat, et plus largement aux institutions, ces « dispositifs coercitifs visant à faire tenir une société à distance et à surmonter la divergence radicale des points de vue » . »

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

Slides des séances passées :

• 18 nov 2013
Antonio A. Casilli (Telecom ParisTech, EHESS)
Le rôle des visualisations de données dans la recherche sur les cultures numériques

• 16 déc 2013
Anne Dalsuet (philosophe, auteure de ‘T’es sur Facebook’, Flammarion 2013), Stéphane Vial (Université de Nîmes)
Amitié et manifestation d’autrui : pour une philosophie des réseaux sociaux numériques

• 20 janv 2014
Nicolas Colin (The Family)
L’Âge de la multitude : Enjeux économiques et de gouvernance après la révolution numérique   

• 17 févr 2014
Estelle Aubouin (CELSA), Sylvain Abel (ISCOM)
Le web éphémère : de 4chan à Snapchat

• 17 mars 2014

Paola Tubaro (U. of Greenwich, CNRS), Antonio A. Casilli (Telecom ParisTech, EHESS)
Web et privacy : le renoncement à la vie privée n’a jamais eu lieu

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

Prochaines séances 2013/14 :

•19 mai 2014
Louise Merzeau (Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense)
Identité numérique vs. présence numérique

•16 juin 2014
Simon Chignard (donneesouvertes.info ) et Samuel Goëta (Telecom ParisTech)
Le mouvement « open data »

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

Share Button

[Slides] Séminaire EHESS AA Casilli & P Tubaro – ‘Web et privacy : le renoncement à la vie privée n’a jamais eu lieu’

Dans le cadre de mon séminaire EHESS Étudier les cultures du numérique : approches théoriques et empiriques, j’ai eu le plaisir d’accueillir Paola Tubaro (maître de conférences à l’Université de Greenwich, Londres) pour une séance « à deux voix » à l’occasion de la parution de notre dernier livre Against the Hypothesis of the End of Privacy. An Agent-Based Modelling Approach to Social Media, publié en 2014 par la maison d’édition Springer.

Antonio A. CASILLI

Paola TUBARO

Web et privacy : sur le prétendu renoncement à la vie privée des utilisateurs d’Internet

Intervenants : Paola Tubaro (University of Greenwich, Londres) — Antonio A. Casilli (Telecom ParisTech / EHESS)

Depuis désormais quelques années, plusieurs voix se lèvent pour dénoncer l’érosion apparemment inexorable de la vie privée dans le web social. En s’adonnant à une surveillance mutuelle et participative, les internautes renoncent-ils volontairement à la protection de leurs données personnelles ? Notre intervention revient sur les événements et les controverses qui ont marqué l’évolution des services de networking en ligne, les modèles d’affaires des entreprises qui en fournissent, et les usages des réseaux finalisés à la formation de capital social, pour montrer que la vie privée a encore de beaux jours devant elle. En adoptant une approche multidisciplinaire permettant un dialogue entre histoire, droit, sociologie et économie, cette intervention propose un changement de perspective, interprétant la privacy non plus au sens juridique classique, comme un noyau individuel à protéger contre toute pénétration par des tiers, mais en son sens social, comme un processus de négociation inter-subjective. La discussion porte sur la manière dont, au travers du travail des associations d’usagers et des organismes préposés à la défense de leurs droits, ces conditions peuvent être remplies.

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

Prochaines séances 2013/14 :

•28 avr 2014

Nicolas Auray (Telecom ParisTech)
Ethique et professionalisation du hacking

•19 mai 2014
Louise Merzeau (Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense)
Identité numérique vs. présence numérique

•16 juin 2014
Simon Chignard (donneesouvertes.info ) et Samuel Goëta (Telecom ParisTech)
Le mouvement « open data »

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

Share Button

30 références pour démystifier 10 idées reçues sur le numérique #pdlt

Hello folks,

si vous êtes des habitués de ce blog ou si vous arrivez ici après avoir écouté l’émission Place de la Toile « 10 idées reçues sur la Toile » (France Culture, 1 mars 2014), ce petit billet présente une liste non exhaustive de références liées au sujet de l’émission. Aiguillonnés par Xavier de la Porte et Thibault Henneton, je me suis penché avec Amaëlle Guiton sur des exemples de « sagesse conventionnelle » (conventional wisdom) communément associés au numérique – pour les complexifier, les décortiquer, parfois les démentir. Personnellement, c’est un exercice auquel je m’adonne assez souvent (par ex. ici, ici ou ici)…

http://www.franceculture.fr/emission-place-de-la-toile-dix-idees-recues-sur-la-toile-2014-03-01

Place de la Toile – France Culture

Revoilà donc les idées reçues que nous avons traité, résumées pour vous et agrémentées de liens vers des ressources bibliographiques, pour vos moments de curiosité intellectuelle.

1. Internet, c’est le virtuel

- Casilli, Antonio A. (2009) « Culture numérique : L’adieu au corps n’a jamais eu lieu ». Esprit, n° 353, p. 151-153.
- Jurgenson, Nathan (2011) « Digital Dualism versus Augmented Reality ». Cyborgology, 24 février.
- Vial, Stéphane (2014) « Contre le virtuel. Une déconstruction ». Médiation Et Information, n° 37,  « Les Territoires du Virtuel »,  p. 177-188.

 

2. Internet, c’est l’accélération du temps

- Crary, Jonathan (2013) 24 /7. Late Capitalism and the Ends of Sleep. Londres, Verso.
- Marinetti, Filippo Tommaso (1909) « Manifeste du Futurisme ». Le Figaro, 20 février.
- Rosa, Hartmut (2010) Accélération. Une critique sociale du temps, Paris, La Découverte.

 

3. Nous sommes addicts à nos outils

- Byun, Sookeun et al. (2009) « Internet Addiction: Metasynthesis of 1996–2006 Quantitative Research ». CyberPsychology & Behavior, vol. 12, n°. 2, p. 203-207.
- Leroux, Yann (2009) « Il n’y a pas d’addiction aux jeux vidéo ». Le Monde.fr, 27 mars.
- Bach, Jean-François, Tisseron, Serge, Houdé, Olivier et Pierre Léna (2013) L’enfant et les écrans. Avis de l’Académie des sciences, Paris, Éditions Le Pommier.

 

4. Internet est une jungle (rumeurs, circulation virale, harcèlement…)

- Beauvisage, Thomas, Beuscart, Jean-Samuel, Couronné, Thomas et Kevin Mellet (2012) « Le succès sur Internet repose-t-ilsur la contagion ? Une analyse desrecherches sur la viralité ». Tracés, n° 21, p. 151-166.
- boyd, danah (2014) It’s Complicated. The Social Lives of Networked Teens, New Haven, Yale University Press.
- Wade, Samuel (2013) « Lawyers Criticize ‘Straitjacket’ for Online Rumors ». China Digital Times (CDT), 10 septembre.

 

5. Les médias sociaux galvaudent l’amitié

- Casilli, Antonio A. (2010) Les liaisons numériques. Vers une nouvelle sociabilité ?, Paris, Seuil.
- Dalsuet, Anne (2013) T’es sur Facebook. Qu’est-ce que les réseaux sociaux changent à l’amitié ?, Paris, Flammarion.
- Doueihi, Milad (2011) Pour un humanisme numérique. Paris, Seuil.

 

6. Internet, c’est la fin de la vie privée

- Casilli, Antonio A. (2013) « Contre l’hypothèse de la ‘fin de la vie privée’ ». Revue française des sciences de l’information et de la communication, n° 3.
- Manach, Jean-Marc (2009)  La vie privée, un problème de vieux cons ?, Limoges, Fyp éditions.
- Nissenbaum, Helen (2009) Privacy in Context. Technology, Policy, and the Integrity of Social Life. Palo Alto, Stanford University Press.

 

7. Internet, c’est le nombrilisme généralisé

- Borsook, Paulina (2000) Cyberselfish: A Critical Romp through the Terribly Libertarian Culture of High Tech. New York, PublicAffairs.
- Cardon, Dominique (2010) La démocratie Internet. Promesses et limites. Paris, Seuil.
- Rainie, Lee et Barry Wellman (2012) Networked the New Social Operating System. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press.

 

8. Les digital natives ne sont pas comme nous

- Bennett, Sue, Maton, Karl et Lisa Kervin (2008) « The ‘digital Natives’ Debate: A Critical Review of the Evidence ». British Journal of Educational Technology, vol. 39, nᵒ 5, p. 775–786.
- Hargittai, Eszter (2010) « Digital Na(t)ives? Variation in Internet Skills and Uses among Members of the ‘Net Generation’ ». Sociological Inquiry, vol. 80, n° 1, p. 92-113.
- Jones, Chris, Ramanau, Ruslan, Cross, Simon et Graham Healing (2010). « Net generation or Digital Natives: Is there a distinct new generation entering university? ». Computers & Education, vol. 54, n° 3, pp. 722–732.

 

9. Internet, c’est le règne de la gratuité

- Barbrook, Richard (2005 [1998]) « The High-Tech Gift Economy ». First Monday, Special issue n° 3.
- Casilli, Antonio A. (2013) « Qu’est-ce que le Digital Labor ? (Audio + slides + biblio) », Bodyspacesociety, 01 avril.
- Scholz, Trebor (2013) « Why Does Digital Labor Matter Now? », in Id. (dir.) Digital Labor. The Internet as playground and factory, New York, Routledge.

 

10. Internet, c’est le triomphe des individus (fin de l’intermédiation)

- Combes Yolande et Sofia Kocergin (2008) « L’intermédiation sur internet : un objet de questionnement pour les industries culturelles »XVIe Congrès SFSIC.
- Eysenbach, Günther (2008) « Medicine 2.0: Social Networking, Collaboration, Participation, Apomediation, and Openness ». Journal of Medical Internet Research, vol. 10, n° 3.
- Lévi-Strauss, Claude (1995), « Sur les brisées d’un humaniste ». Pierre Dreyfus (1907-1994), Paris, Gallimard, p. 83-86.

Share Button

Dropbox : pourquoi les nouvelles conditions d’utilisation contribuent à exploiter votre digital labor

Ce billet a été cité par le site d’information Numérama.

Si, comme moi, vous êtes des utilisateurs de Dropbox, le 20 février 2014 vous avez reçu un mail qui présente les nouvelles conditions d’utilisation de la très populaire plateforme de sauvegarde et partage de fichiers. Ces conditions entreront en vigueur le 24 mars.

Ce n’est certainement pas la première fois que les CGU de Dropbox suscitent la colère des utilisateurs. Cette fois-ci, beaucoup de polémiques ayant dénoncé la nature arbitraire de ces modifications et le ton abrupt de leur formulation ont porté sur la nouvelle clause qui impose aux usagers de passer par une procédure d’arbitrage en cas de litige. En lisant les commentaires sur le blog de Dropbox, je vois bien les enjeux pour les citoyens américains de se conformer à cette nouvelle condition, et l’intérêt de faire un opt-out. Je vois mois bien comment cette clause s’applique à des citoyens de pays tiers.

La lutte des class action

Par contre, la nouvelle condition qui a attiré mon attention (à cause de ses conséquences pour tout le monde) est la suivante :

Pas de recours collectif. Vous pouvez uniquement résoudre les litiges avec nous sur une base individuelle, et ne pouvez pas déposer de réclamation dans une procédure de recours collectif, consolidé, ou en représentation conjointe. Les arbitrages collectifs, recours collectifs, actions d’ordre général avec avocat privé et consolidation avec tout autre type d’arbitrage ne sont pas autorisés.

Ici, pas de possibilité de faire opt-out… Et c’est dommage, parce que ce changement intervient un mois à peine après l’introduction en France du système de procédure collective (adopté le 13 février dernier, au bout d’un parcours législatif long et tourmenté). Et ce recours collectif, mieux connu à l’étranger sous le nom de class action, s’avère chaque jour plus efficace pour contrer les changements subreptices des grandes plateformes potentiellement nuisibles pour les intérêts des usagers. Un exemple parmi d’autres : regardez ce qui se passe avec Facebook, qui depuis 2011 n’arrive pas à faire cesser cette plainte de familles et d’associations d’usagers qui s’opposent à l’utilisation de photos de mineurs dans les sponsored stories (cette feature a été entre temps abandonnée).

Négociation collective et conflit social sur les plateformes du web

Si vous connaissez mes travaux sur la négociation des droits des utilisateurs des plateformes sociales, ou mon nouveau livre sur les conflits entourant les politiques de privacy des géants du web (Against the Hypothesis of the End of Privacy, tout juste publié chez Springer, co-écrit avec Paola Tubaro et Yasaman Sarabi), vous savez qu’autour des termes d’utilisation c’est désormais guerre ouverte entre les utilisateurs, soucieux de voir leur autonomie et leurs droits respectés, et les propriétaires des plateformes, intéressés à maximiser leurs profits tout en minimisant leur respect des lois en vigueur.

dropboxlabor

En interdisant à ses utilisateurs de consolider leurs actions légales, Dropbox s’efforce de leur empêcher de s’organiser et de mener une action coordonnée de protection de leurs droits. La petite mise à jour des CGU est assimilable aux politiques patronales du siècle passé visant à entraver l’action syndicale et à imposer une pacification forcée des relations sociales. L’entreprise de San Francisco cherche en somme à atomiser l’action sociale de ceux qui produisent les contenus qui circulent sur ses réseaux, sont stockés sur ses serveurs, constituent l’objet de l’activité économique exercée par les 4 millions d’entreprises qui adhèrent à l’offre payante Dropbox for Business. Si le travail invisible des utilisateurs doit être reconnu à sa juste valeur (c’est ce qu’on appelle désormais le digital labor), les droits des utilisateurs/travailleurs méritent tout aussi d’être protégés. Tout ceci s’inscrit, pour le dire avec les rédacteurs de la revue Multitudes, dans une dynamique plus vaste de conflictualité sociale qui traverse désormais le monde du numérique. Et les conditions d’utilisations sont justement l’un des lieux où ces controverses et de ces conflits se déploient.

Update [samedi 22 février 12h20]

Quelques messages intéressants, tirés de la discussion Twitter entre le sociologue Pierre Grosdemouge et la juriste Eve Matringe, suite à la parution de ce billet :

Share Button

Seminaire EHESS/CVPIP de Nicolas Colin « L’âge de la multitude » (20 janvier 2014, 17h)

Dans le cadre du séminaire EHESS Étudier les cultures du numérique : approches théoriques et empiriques et en collaboration avec le séminaire de la Chaire Valeurs et Politiques des Informations Personnelles de l’Institut Mines Télécom, nous avons le plaisir d’accueillir Nicolas Colin (The Family), co-auteur avec Henri Verdier de L’Âge de la Multitude, Armand Colin, 2012 et avec Pierre Collin du Rapport sur la fiscalité du secteur numérique, Ministère de l’économie, 2013.

multitudes

La séance aura lieu le lundi 20 janvier 2014, de 17h à 19h en salle 7, à l’EHESS, 105 bd. Raspail, Paris.

L’âge de la multitude : enjeux économiques et de gouvernance après la révolution numérique

Le projet d’écrire ‘L’âge de la multitude’ résulte d’un constat simple : la révolution numérique est achevée et ses effets sur l’économie et la société sont désormais mieux compris, mieux ressentis et mieux documentés. Pour les dirigeants d’entreprises et les responsables politiques, il est donc temps de passer à l’action, non sans réviser leur conception de leurs activités et de leur environnement. Après la révolution numérique, l’essentiel des enjeux se concentre désormais dans la multitude, ces milliards d’individus de plus en plus éduqués, équipés et connectés, dont l’activité quotidienne déploie une puissance supérieure à celle qu’exerce les plus grandes organisations. Dans ce nouveau contexte politique et industriel, les organisations qui prennent l’avantage sont celles qui parviennent à forger avec la multitude une alliance, autrement dit à nouer avec les individus un lien privilégié, quasiment intime, qui se fonde avant tout sur la confiance. A ce jour, seules des entreprises américaines sont parvenues à réaliser cette alliance à grande échelle. La France peut-elle relever elle aussi ce défi et, si oui, à quelles conditions ?

Share Button

Technologies for Political and Social Innovation: Joint Workshop Stanford / ParisTech (Paris, Dec. 3, 2013)

In the last few months, with a small team of dedicated colleagues from Mines Paristech and Telecom Paristech (all belonging to the newborn i3 – Interdisciplinary Institute on Innovation), we’ve been working on a partnership with Stanford’s Peace Innovation Lab (PIL). In view of formalizing and rendering effective this new research venture, we’ll be holding the open workshop Technologies for Political and Social Innovation on Tuesday, December 3rd, 2013 at Telecom ParisTech 46 rue Barrault, F-75013 Paris

PILi3

Joint Workshop Stanford Peace Innovation Lab (PIL) ParisTech Interdisciplinary Institute on Innovation i3

Tuesday, December 3rd, 2013 – Telecom ParisTech 46 rue Barrault, F-75013 Paris [getting there]

Participating Institutions:

i3 Interdisciplinary Institute on Innovation Stanford Peace Innovation Lab

Organizing team

  • Margarita Quihuis, Mark Nelson – Stanford University Peace Innovation Lab
  • Antonio Casilli, Dana Diminescu, Annie Gentès, Armand Hatchuel, Gérard Pogorel – Mines ParisTech / Telecom ParisTech Interdisciplinary Institute on Innovation i3

This Workshop intends to illustrate the convergence and interactions…

… of lines of research and activities pursued at both the Stanford University Peace Innovation Lab (PIL) and ParisTech Interdisciplinary Institute on Innovation i3, and explore avenues of collaboration between the organizers and invited researchers.

This first workshop will focus on Technologies for Political and Social Innovation.

Draft Programme

9:00-9:30 Introduction

  • Gérard Pogorel, i3 Navigating cosmopolitism and the pitfalls of directism: Internet 2.0 or Internet 0.2?

09:30-11:00 Peace Innovation Lab: a Design Project

  • Mark Nelson, Stanford Peace Innovation Lab
  • Niels Einar Veirum, Aalborg University and Stanford Peace Innovation Lab
  • Morten Karnøe Søndergaard, Aalborg University
  • François Huguet, i3
  • Annie Gentès, i3

11:00-11:20 Break

11:20-12:30 Do design models engage political models? Comment des pratiques de design reposent sur des modèles politiques

  • Bill Gaver, Goldsmiths College
  • Annie Gentès, i3
  • Alison Powell, London School of Economics & Political Sciences

12:30-12:50 General discussion

13:00- Buffet Lunch

14:00-15:00 Redefining social and political structures and hierarchies

  • Antonio Casilli, i3 Conflicts/Social Networks
  • Nicolas Auray, i3 Redécrire le crypto anarchisme des hackers: attitudes des hackers par rapport à l’État

15:00-16:00 Can design theory contribute to peace processes?

  • Armand Hatchuel, i3
  • Workshop organisers

16:00-17:00 General Discussion & Future plans

 

Share Button

[Slides] Séminaire EHESS : le rôle des visualisations de données dans la recherche sur les cultures numériques

Lundi 18 novembre 2013 à 17h, a eu lieu la première séance 2013/14 de mon séminaire EHESS Étudier les cultures du numérique : approches théoriques et empiriques. Voilà les slides :

Le rôle des visualisations de données dans la recherche sur les cultures numériques

Face à la multiplication des dispositifs de création et de gestion des données, des outils innovants pour leur exploitation se sont développés, en particulier dans le domaine de la visualisation. En passant par des exemples de dataviz appliquées à l’analyse des réseaux sociaux, nous discuterons la signification et les conséquences de l’«esthétisation de la donnée» : d’une part la promesse d’aider la démocratisation de l’accès aux résultats de la recherche, de l’autre le risque de réification de la donnée et de dissimulation des conditions matérielles de sa production. Surtout à l’aune de l’émergence des big data, la question de la visualisation des données s’avère inextricable de celle relative au régime social de sa production, structuration, documentation et acquisition.

Le séminaire a lieu à l’EHESS tous les troisièmes lundi du mois (sauf pour le mois d’avril, pour lequel le quatrième lundi est retenu). Pour le détail des dates et les salles, se référer à la page web de l’enseignement.  Pour une présentation générale du séminaire, voir le programme publié sur Bodyspacesociety.

Share Button

Spamming social media to mute political dissent: the new face of censorship

A fairly interesting paper on the use of Twitter spam as a tool to mute political dissent was presented at the USENIX workshop on Free and Open Communication on the Internet (FOCI ’13) by John-Paul Verkamp and Minaxi Gupta (Indiana University). Here, you’ll find an audio presentation,  as well as the slides and the pdf of the study.

Verkamp, J-P and M Gupta, 2013. Five Incidents, One Theme: Twitter Spam as a Weapon to Drown Voices of Protest. Free and Open Communications on the Internet (Washington, DC, USA), USENIX.

The primary interest of this paper lies in the international comparison of 5 cases of politically motivated spam campaigns concurrent with activist mobilization on Twitter. This touches four countries (Syria, China, Russia, Mexico) from April 2011 to May 2012. Spam messages can be either politically oriented (expressing opinions or pointing to more or less related news stories) or opportunistic (mostly with URLs to commercial pages). In both cases the outcome is the same: spam tweets flood politically relevant hashtags, disrupt political conversation and interfere with the flow of information.

The ratio of spam/non spam messages vary, but spamming is always sustained and in three incidents (China 2, Mexico, and Russia) activists’ messages are positively dwarfed and utimately suppressed by spam.

SpamCensor

The timing is actually interesting. Most of the messages are automated spams delivered via scripts, peaking every hour at given times. But,  at least for Mexico and Russia, there is a clear tendency to mimick non-spam users and adapt to everyday patterns exhibited by human activity.

SpamURLs

Spam messages have significantly fewer retweets (except for the Syrian case). Moreover, accounts tend to have very few followers. Which means that spammers have to rely on direct targeting of users (by mentioning them in tweets). Unfortunately, this strategy has been successfully used by spammers to muddle activists’ campaigns in the past. The simple fact of containing a mention cannot qualify a message as spam: this does not help activists identify and filter them.

So other criteria have to be used. The authors suggest spammers account registration (which tends to occur in blocks) and their usernames (tend to show some similarities). As for block registration, the authors cannot have access to IP data, so they were not able to confirm the results of previous studies having demonstrated that spam accounts tend to be registered using machines all over the world, while non-spam are locally registered. Twitter spammers account appear to be generated automatically. The algorithm used to create their names can be reverse-engineered: almost 85% of them are exactly 15 characters in length (the maximum allowed by Twitter) and display some patterns (like {name}+{family name}+{random numbers}).

In sum, spammer usernames and in-blocks account registrations appear to be the only paths the authors suggest to follow if we want to find some way of stopping the censorship-motivated flooding of political conversations online. Any other feature differ dramatically across incidents, and designing common strategies based on them to limit spam tweets and accounts doesn’t seem promising. Especially because spammers tend to closely mimicking human activity.

In this case, fighting spam is not a matter of ‘clean communication’ but a way of allowing free expression of political dissent online. It matters because disagreement is central to democratic debate. As Finn Brunton states in his book Spam. A Shadow History of the Internet, spam is a remarkably consistent notion that over the years has encompassed a number of domains (technological, financial, medical, etc.). But one common trait of the various permutations of this socio-technological object is the fact of exploiting ‘exisiting aggregations of human attention’ and, in so doing, helping human aggregates to recognize themselves as communities of interests.

Share Button

Next Page →